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Thread: Replacement chain? Brand? wear issues.

  1. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomg View Post
    Anyone ever use a SRAM power link on a Shimano chain? Will it work?
    It works just fine, just match up the correct speed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomg View Post
    Anyone ever use a SRAM power link on a Shimano chain? Will it work?
    It has worked for me, but I have heard a couple people have problems. Could have been caused by the lube they used and/or whether they removed the factory lube..... YMMV.
    I also use a wippermen "power link" on a 10 speed road chain without issue.
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  3. #16
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    Anyone ever use a SRAM power link on a Shimano chain? Will it work?
    The secret of eternal youth is arrested development

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    Dave- I should be more clear in saying that when I break/twist links, it's always because I have an oh poop moment and panic shift because I wasn't ready for the approaching climb. The cross-chaining issue isnt' nearly as big of a problem on my 2x0 drivetrain.

  5. #14
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    Good information on this thread - add this if you will.

    Frank, if you are twisting links then you may benefit from a change in drive train use. Pay attention not only to shifting underload but also to your gear combinations under load which is chain alignment. Cross chain under load will place great strain on your chain. Basicaly this is side loading your chain and they really are meant to be linear loaded (like wheel bearings too). Learn to shift front rings more often to reduce this side load which should solve your kinked links issue. Also then you will benefit from less wear on your rings and cassette. Downside is more work for you....in some situations you may shift front ring and have to shift back cassette too in order to have a good gear leverage as the tooth difference between front rings is quite wide.

    In general it works like this -

    Use inside ring (small ring) with inside cassette cogs - not the smallest 2 or 3 cogs.
    Use oustide ring (big ring) with outside cassette coggs - not the largest 2 or 3 coggs.
    Use middle ring with middle cassette coggs - not the largest or smallest coggs.

    FYI to those whom do not like using power link - there is a specific pin make to rejoin chain in leiu of quick link. This pin has third ridge and a snap off of extra pin material after insertion. I only use quick links and never have a problem. Caution- be aware of alainment, load, shifting ( Wipperman -the quick link is odd shaped on one end-more material more strenth... I used them both ways but try to use the standard shape as the leading edge on the oustide postion of the link, as chain travels towards the front rings, for upshifting uniformity.

    FYI Grease on brand new chain is packing grease, according to a Shimano engineer. Its sole purpose is to protect the product from corrosion while under ownership of manufacturer, resellers and end user - until it is put in service at which time this grease should be removed for best product performance.

    I always remove the grease and lube a brand new chain. Dirt is abrasive and sticks really good to grease, Question- Why put grease on your rings and coggs too ????

  6. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingerdawg View Post
    Derailleurs and cassettes and chains should interchange fine, just not shifters and rear derailleurs.
    Sorry, I read your post too quickly. +1 on rear shifters/derailleurs.
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  7. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigwheel View Post
    +1. I was going to say the same thing, but didn't want to argue that topic yet again.


    But I haven't noticed any issues with derailleur or cassette brands. Mix any chain, any derailleur, any cassette.
    Derailleurs and cassettes and chains should interchange fine, just not shifters and rear derailleurs.
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  8. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingerdawg View Post
    I have noticed, with my last couple of new SRAM chains that the factory lube makes them very stiff and prone to chain suck and clicking. I have had to clean/de-grease the factory waxy stuff off of the chain to get them freed up enough to behave.
    +1. I was going to say the same thing, but didn't want to argue that topic yet again.


    But I haven't noticed any issues with derailleur or cassette brands. Mix any chain, any derailleur, any cassette.
    Leb borgata capodecina

  9. #10
    Big Air
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    SRAM and Shimano chains & casettes should be 100% interchangable. They only issues between SRAM and Shimano drivetrains is using like shifters and rear derailleurs (SRAM shifters with SRAM derailleurs or SHIMANO shifters with Shimano derailleurs)
    I have noticed, with my last couple of new SRAM chains that the factory lube makes them very stiff and prone to chain suck and clicking. I have had to clean/de-grease the factory waxy stuff off of the chain to get them freed up enough to behave. I prefer the SRAM chains over Shimano for the powerlink and they seem to last longer.
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  10. #9
    Dirt Boss - Lebanon Hills
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    Mark, chains should be interchangeable between brands, assuming you stick with the same width (i.e., 8,9,10 speed)

    There is no wear-in period. They should run perfectly right out of the box.

    If your cassette is worn, a new chain will jump on your cassette. You'll find that this happens in your "favorite" gears, because those are the most worn. The cassette will look good, but if some of the teeth are getting pointy or (worse yet) start to get little hooks in them, you will have a problem. This is caused mainly by not replacing your chain soon enough. The chain "stretches", causing the cassette and chainrings to wear in a way that compensates. I'm not positive about this, but it seems like Sram cassettes tend to exhibit this behavior sooner than Shimano. Anyway, the only solution I know of is to replace the cassette.

    Similarly, if your front chainrings are worn, you can end up with "Chain Suck", where the chain wraps around your chainring rather than dropping off at the bottom.
    Leb borgata capodecina

  11. #8
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    thanks to all who replied. good stuff

    Re-cap: 2 bikes both needed new chain (1/16 stretched) - swapped brands, had Shimano, LBS recommended SRAM replacement had less than great performance (skipping).

    So my questions ---- Is the SRAM chain a replacement for the Shimano? Do new chains have a wear-in period?


    I now have a new Shimano chain on my g/f bike. The skipping stop and it's shifting great. I would have to say based on this experience that a New SRAM chain is not a replacement for a used shimano.

    On my bike, I still have the SRAM replacement chain. It doesn't seem to be running as good as my old shimano, but it does seem to have settled (not skipping) -- Id say that it did WEAR-IN, or maybe I just learned to crank in a more SRAM chain friendly style.

    Anyway, your experience many be different.

    Lesson? I am unlike to swap chair brands in the future when replacing used chain.


    WOW, I am learning a lot about bikes.

  12. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thunder View Post
    1/16" is equivalent to 1.59mm of stretch. My chain checker has two positions, .75mm and 1mm, where .75mm is your warning and 1mm is considered the end of life for a good chain. I replace chains at .75mm of stretch and replace cassettes as needed, maybe every five to eight chains.

    my Park chain checker has .5 and .75 markings, but that is over something like 5 or 6 inches, not 12. So, .75mm over 6" (12 links) is 1.5mm in 12" (24 links)
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  13. #6
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    Bob, I USUALLY only have problems with the chain popping at the quick-links, but if it's a regular problem, upon inspection I will find twisting in other places so I replace the chain. I'd be willing to give Wipperman a shot though and see how they perform against the KMC chains I've been running.

  14. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHRANQUY View Post
    I wish my chains lasted long enough for me to put much thought into stretch, but twisted links are my problem... shifting under load = bad news for chains.
    Add that to my long list of bad habits.

    If this is your problem, I recommend Wipperman 908 chains. They do a better job at peening the edges of their pins over the outer links. Prior to switching to Wipperman a few years ago, I used to break a lot of chains on geared bikes. (not on single-speeds) Since switching, zero (so far).

    Wipperman chains don't wear any better than Sram/Shimano. Maybe even worse. But they don't seem to break as easily when you screw up and put a sideways load on them.

    Try this semi-scientific experiment:

    Take your worst chain tool. The one that hurts your fingers to use. (pain is your gauge) Then take a scrap of Sram/Shimano chain and a scrap of Wipperman. Switch back and forth, pushing links apart on each brand. You'll find that your fingers hurt more when pressing links out of a Wipperman chain compared to the others.
    Leb borgata capodecina

  15. #4
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    I wish my chains lasted long enough for me to put much thought into stretch, but twisted links are my problem... shifting under load = bad news for chains.

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